Odd gorilla, anybody seen anything like this

I have a gorilla #4 that is some type of mutant. It has small variegated leaves, some of which has spikes, entire plant leaves are two toned. Very pretty but I’ve never seen it. Came from a packet that I’ve grown 8 plants from.

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Are the STEMS on the OTHER plants as red/purple as these?

In cause I want to see the response about the significance of red/purple stems.

Once we determine if it is NOT THE STRAIN, red means magnesium deficiency and purple means ph at the ROOTS issue.

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They are on the stems not covered with foliage.The other 2 gorilla s look nice.

Feeding Calmag every other watering.

Are they also on the GOOD plants? IS this one closest to the light (right under it)?
The striation of the leaves is odd but it appears to be connected to nutrients / watering (maybe a little too much/often) and possiblt ph or temps. Is she on a cold floor?

Idk but shes gorgeous. Watch it be your best tasting and most potent😃 with that camo color she really is a gorilla(guerilla)

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How does she smell? The bud looks nice

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*all plants are the same distance from lights. Warm floor and not anything on the other plants . More small buds on this plant than anything I’ve ever grown.

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Thanks Smells great, might have another 3 weeks! Yowza.

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It’s in a 3x3x7 so all are a little cramped.

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So you might be seeing what / where / how genetics can creep back in. When we have hybridized strains, the genetics come from different parents / grandparents, great grandparents. Sometimes the dominant genes either regress or take over. You might be seeing a throwback…just let her grow. If all conditions are the same (lights, substrate, nutrients, feedings), then it is either bacterial or genetic

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From the beginning I thought it was genetic . I have looked at a lot of photos and have not found anything close. It was evident right after germination. Maybe it will be the best ever.

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For future reference, what do you do if it’s purple. I have heard about the cal/mag deficiency.

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I have also read about sunburn on stems not covered by foliage. Raised lights to the maximum height and lost the color on stems. The irregular leaf shape,curling, and color are interesting. I’ve had people say tobacco mosaic virus but nothing I’ve seen compares to mine. Thanks everyone, I think Kyle invented this.

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Whenever there is a nutrient issue, you should first get back to a baseline (where your substrate did not have issues). Usually straight water flushing and a few days on clear liquids will eliminate the problem, if it is related to feeding. Sometimes we go about things the wrong way…when we go to the store, the store manager does not tell us what to buy, we tell them what we need / want. We are so sucked in by the nutrient companies to think we have issues with N or P or K or all / some of them. The first sign of anything other than PRISTINE and we jump to a nutrient solution.
If you are using a living soil…organic…at least comprising 50% (or more) of your substrate, nothing more than a top feeding is necessary and maybe once a month to 6 weeks. That is not the same as an amendment…
Calcium, magnesium,sulfur, micro nutrients…(kelp, molasses, etc) in an organic nature will not BURN, lock or hurt a plant.
Stems are colored for many reasons…light, strain, stress, ph, Rh…It doesn’t mean there is a problem, it means we look deeper. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. When one plant differs from others (PLURAL IS A KEY INDICATOR HERE), then we either have a bacterial issue or genetics are doing something MOST (not all) of the time. Cal/Mag deficiency is prevalent in non organic substrates…coco, peat, rockwool, hydro…Places where they naturally do not exist.
I wish there was a straight forward…THIS IS THE ISSUE, but that is usually NOT THE CASE
Most of the time, we just need to let them grow

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Thanks Mike, I am very specific about my plant care. Nutrient schedule per Grow Weed Easy which was a reduced amount of nutrients than past grows, water always between 5.5 -6.5 which is recommended for coco. Let’s watch this critter and see what I get after the cure. Again, thanks for your input.JF

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I see you mentioned “recommended for coco”. If you are in a coco environment, the cal/mag requirement increases becasue there is NONE in coco. Consider add a foliar spray, unless well into flowering

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You are so close to finish you probably won’t be able to fix it. I would just let it flower in peace and take notes if you are using the same plants again. Then experiment heavy with the clones of that plant and see if it’s the genes or the nutrients.

The left sun leaf bent forward looks like a leaf mutation I got last season. With the light and dark areas. Mine was dark green on one side and light green on the other. Each individual sun leaf was 2 tone. Right down the midrib of the center leaf blade. It was a sour diesel.

I also have to mention one of my crosses I lovingly call anemic haze. It is an ugly, sad, curly, undersized sun leaves and a weird pattern very similar to your GG4. I would normally rip that plant out and end the line. But it grows these delicious strawberry and blueberry flavored buds I just love. And it grows really big and vigorous. But ugly sick looking and very light yellow green stems and leaves. I have played with the clones for 3 grow seasons and it never looks better no mater what I do to it nutrient (and location in my garden). So I gave up and now call it anemic haze. The point is USUALLY it a deficiency or ph issue, but sometimes it is NOT.

I 100% agree w mike it could just be the coco and that one needs more calmag than the other sisters. I would soil on one of the clones next run and preload the soil with extra cal and mag. That would be my first experiment.

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